Fast Facts on COPD

What you need to know about COPD

What is
COPD?

Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) is a progressive lung disease, which makes it difficult for people to breathe properly.1 If not addressed early, COPD symptoms may get worse, leading to increased burden and even death for patients.

It is composed of two lung problems.

Chronic bronchitis – increased cough and mucus production caused by inflammation of the airways.6

Emphysema – damage of the air sacs and/or collapse of the smallest breathing tubes in the lungs.7

COPD is a Global Health Problem

According to the Global Burden of Disease Study by the World Health Organization, COPD may become the third leading cause of death worldwide by 2030.2

COPD also affects the economic and social aspects of an individual as it can limit him or her from doing extensive work.



Risk Factors

COPD In the Philippines

COPD is one of the 10 leading causes of death in the Philippines.3 It has a prevalence rate of 14% among Filipino adults aged 40 and above.4

Only 2% of the cases are diagnosed by doctors in contrast to the overall prevalence.5

Habitual smoking can inflame the linings of lungs' airways and can make the airways lose their elastic quality.

Risk Factors

References:
1.Global Initiative for Chronic Onstructive Lung Disease, GOLD. 2015. Global Strategy for the Diagnosis, Management, and Prevention of Chronic Pulmonary Disease. London: GOLD. 2. World Health Organization. 2014. Burden of COPD. [ONLINE] Available at: http://www.who.int/respiratory/copd/burden/en.[Accessed 31 October 14]. 3. Department of Health, National Statistics Office, 2009. Tobacco Use In the Philippines. Philippines Global Adult Tobacco Survey (GATS),1,33. 4. Buist, A. et. Al. International variation in the prevalence of COPD [The BOLD Study]: a population based prevalence study. Lancet 2007: Vol 370, Issue 9589, 741-50. 5. Idolor, et. al. LF, 2011. Burden of obstructive lung disease in rural setting in the Philippines. Asia Pacific Society of respiratory Journal. 1, 1112.6. Understanding chronic bronchitis. American Lung Association Web site. http://www.lung.org/lung-disease/bronchitis-chronic/understanding-chronic-bronchitis.html. Para 1, 2.7. What is chronic obstruction pulmonary disease (COPD)? American Thoracic Society Web site. http://www.thoracic.org/clinical/copd-guidelines/for-patients/what-is-chronic-obstructive-pulmonary-disease-copd.php. "What is emphysema" section, para 1,2. See second link immediately above.

Are you at a Risk


The Filipino Smoker

In the Philippines, more than half of Filipino households are not smoke-free. Among ASEAN members, the Philippines had the second highest smoking prevalence rate (SEATCA, 2007). Every year, there are about 20,000 smoking-related deaths in thecountry.1

But being aware of these numbers is only half of the story.

Health experts estimate that 10 Filipinos die of smoke-related disease every hour. Lung cancer is one of the top cancer-related deaths among Filipino men and the third for women.3 COPD or Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease is also in the 10 leading causes of death among Filipinos.3

Lung cancer, colon cancer, leukemia – the list goes on. Smoking can cause cancer almost anywhere in your body.5

Lifestyle choices, family history and the environment can contribute to the development of lung cancer, however, 90% of cases are caused by smoking, and it is undoubtedly the leading cause of lung cancer deaths in men and women.5

Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease

Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease

COPD is a progressive disease characterized by persistent limited airflow.This disease includes chronic bronchitis or increased cough due to inflammation of the airways, and emphysema or damage of the breathing tubes in the lungs.6

If not properly addressed, COPD symptoms may get worse, leading to increased burden and even death for patients.

The symptoms of COPD include shortness of breath, fatigue, wheezing and coughing. Cigarette smoking causes 80% to 90% of COPD cases.7

It is one of the 10 leading causes of death in the Philippines and may become the third leading cause of death worldwide by 2030.7

Smoking can increase the risk of stroke and heart attack. The chemicals found in cigarette smoke may reduce the amount of oxygen your heart gets, can raise blood pressure and harm the interior of blood vessels including those in your heart. Even people who smoke fewer than five cigarettes a day can have early signs of cardiovascular disease.4

We are all familiar with how smoking can darken the gums. But did you know that smoking could also affect the health of your teeth and cause tooth loss?4 It can also lead to teeth discoloration, bad breath, gum disease and oral cancer.

Smoking may also cause reproductive problems for men and women. It can make it harder for a woman to become pregnant and can affect her baby's health before and after birth. Smoking can also have a negative impact on men's sperm, which can reduce fertility and also increase risks for birth defects.4

Be smart. Don’t compromise your health, your family’s well being and your own productivity by giving in to the habit of smoking. There is always a choice and breaking this habit, which is preventable, will benefit you and your loved ones in the long run.

To be sure, ask your doctor or healthcare provider about the smoking-related diseases that can affect you and your loved ones.

References:
1. Promoting Smoke-Free Individuals. WHO-Western Pacific Regional Office Website. http://www.wpro.who.int/philippines/publications/module5.pdf 2. Department of Health, National Statistics Office, 2009. Tobacco Use in the Philippines. Philippines Global Adult Tobacco Survey (GATS), 1, 33. 3. Department of Health. 2014. Leading Causes of Mortality. [ONLINE] Available at: http://www.doh.gov.ph/node/198.html. [Accessed 31 October 14].4. Global Initiative for Chronic Obstructive Lung Disease, GOLD, 2015. Global Strategy for the Diagnosis, Management, and Prevention of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease. 1st ed. London: GOLD. 5 World Health Organization. 2014. Burden of COPD. [ONLINE] Available at: http://www.who.int/respiratory/copd/burden/en/. [Accessed 31 October 14].6. Buist A. et. al, International variation in the prevalence of COPD (The BOLD Study): a population based prevalence study. Lancet 2007; Vol 370, Issue 9589, 741-50. 7. Idolor, et al., LF, 2011. Burden of obstructive lung disease in a rural setting in the Philippines. Asia Pacific Society of Respirology Journal, 1, 1112.